Follow Us on Facebook

10 Tips for Depression

depression
Depression is classified as a mental health problem. Personally, I don’t like this label because it stigmatises something that one in four people will experience in any one year.  Also, depression is such a wide issue.  It can mean that you are feeling low, or you have Seasonal Effective Disorder, or Post-Natal Depression, and it could mean that you have Bipolar disorder.

But depression can come from a variety of sources: your thinking (negativity); boredom (apathy); from stress (overwhelm); from sensitivity to life issues and can also have a biological cause – not enough serotonin will be enough to create a depressive phase.

Here are 10 tips to help you get yourself back into feeling good:

  1. Research shows that doing something nice for someone else lifts your mood.  It doesn’t have to be a big thing either.  Sometimes just opening a door for someone, letting someone go in front of you in a queue, or even a smile to a stranger, can be enough to lift you.  Kindness is one of those things that gives you something when you give it away.
  2. Exercise is brilliant for changing your mood.  It creates endorphins (brain chemicals which help you feel happy).  And you can do anything from Zumba, to running, to tennis.  The list is endless and exercising outside has an even more positive effect.
  3. Do things you really enjoy – or used to enjoy before you became depressed.  Do it even though you don’t feel like it.  It may seem a lot of effort up front but it can change your state quite quickly.  Once you start, it’s easier to carry on.
  4. Practice positive thinking.  The nature of your thinking can have a huge impact on mood.  If you feel bad, your thinking is almost definitely going to be negative.  By focusing on different things or changing how you view things, you can have an incredibly positive effect on how you feel.  Think Positive, Feel Good has a simple framework which shows you how to do this.  
  5. Plan your day around a comfortable routine.  When you are feeling low, it is all too easy to stay in bed.  This doesn’t make you feel better, it just disconnects you from the world.  So your routine should include things like taking a shower, doing some chores, taking a walk, calling a friend, listening to some feel-good music, finishing off a project.  Make sure that your tasks are realistic and reward yourself when you have achieved something.
  6. Make a list of your positive qualities and achievements.  Depression detaches you from these so write them down and read them often.  If you are struggling to come up with anything, think about what someone else would say your best traits and achievements are.  If you want a different perspective on this, watch the film 'It’s a Wonderful Life'.
  7. Make a list of all the things you’re grateful for.  Again, depression can cause you to lose sight of what is good in your life and fool you into thinking that only bad things happen.  Look at this list daily and whenever you need a boost.
  8. Avoid nicotine, alcohol and caffeine as these deplete your body of nutrients which can have a negative effect on your mood.  Alcohol is particularly bad because it is a depressant.  Before you wean yourself off these, find a new coping strategy to replace them.  EFT is brilliant for this.  Here is a video to demonstrate EFT or call me if you want some coaching on it (see below for contact details).
  9. Eliminate wheat from your diet. There is research to suggest that wheat is linked to depression.  Consider eliminating it from your diet for a month to see what difference it makes to you.  Instead, eat foods which boost your mood.  For more information on this, read this article about mood boosting food.
  10. Talk to someone.  A sympathetic friend (who doesn’t keep you stuck), The Samaritans or a compassionate professional can all help you to get back to your happy self.

If you are suffering from depression, and would like some support, why not have a free initial telephone consultation?  Call Tricia Woolfrey on 0345 130 0854.

© Tricia Woolfrey 2015