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10 Tips to Manage Stress

Stress

 

Stress is an unavoidable part of everyday life and can come with many guises:  tight deadlines, finances, difficult relationships, job insecurity, a noisy work environment, being expected to do something you haven’t been trained to deal with and, the biggest stressor, just having way too much to do.

Untreated, it can play havoc with your health, with your relationships and your career.  This article will give you 10 tips to manage stress more successfully so you can enjoy a greater sense of calm and resourcefulness in your life.
 

  1. Recognise that some stress is actually good for you.  If you didn’t have any stress at all, you would be pretty bored.  Some stress is motivating and energising – the trick is to have it in proportion so it doesn’t have a negative impact on you.
  2. Acknowledge that stress is a valid emotion with a purpose for you:  it is calling for your attention to whatever is causing the feeling of tension or overwhelm so that you can deal with it. If you listen to what your stress is telling you and take appropriate action, you will notice yourself feeling much less stressed.  It is a survival mechanism, intended as a fight or flight response if you are in danger.  In more everyday terms, if you ignore it, the stress will increase until you take remedial action.  If you address it, you can become more stress-resilient.
  3. Identify your top stressors and give them a score out of 10 as to how much stress they are causing you.
  4. From this list, evaluate the stressors according to the following criteria:

     

     

     

     

    • Is it something which you can control in any way?  For example, the weather is something you can’t control.
    • Is it something you can influence?  While you can’t control the weather, you can control what you wear for it, whether you go out in it and the temperature in a room.
    • Is it something you just have to accept?  If you are outside and there is a sudden downpour with no shelter in sight, and you are dressed for the summer sun you were promised in the news bulletin before you left, then it is just something you have to accept.
  5. Once you have determined whether something is within your control or not you have two options:

     

     

     

     

    • Do whatever you can to control or influence the situation.  Saying ‘no’ to someone who is overloading you, for example.
    • If it is something you just have to accept, knowing this, rather than resisting it, can really relieve a lot of stress for you.  You can then focus on things you can do something about.
  6. If the list is overwhelming and you don’t know where to start, sometimes breaking a big stressor down into smaller chunks can really help, or dealing with a small stressor first to give you a sense of moving forward.  The worst thing to do is nothing, so even starting small can be a big help.
  7. Do not confuse dealing with stress with distracting from it.  Many people use distractors like comfort eating, drinking alcohol, smoking, spending, over-exercising or gambling as a way of managing how they feel.  But distraction is not a stress-management technique which works in the long-term.  It provides short-term relief but causes bigger problems for you in the long-run.
  8. Learn mindfulness, EFT or self-hypnosis as a way of handling stress.  They all make a positive and significant difference on what you can handle on a day-to-day basis.
  9. Learn to say ‘no’ and mean it.  For many people, a lot of their stress is just saying ‘yes’ to things they should be saying ‘no’ too.  This causes ongoing problems as deadlines are missed and disappointment, resentment and guilt results.  Learning to say ‘no’ kindly and respectfully is an incredibly helpful stress-management technique.
  10. Balance your life with time to yourself doing things you enjoy and making sure they include regular exercise, time out in nature and just being in the moment.

These are a good starting point.  Stress has many sources, many affects and many consequences.  Everyone is different and some solutions will work for you and some won’t.  If you need further guidance or support, or you don’t find the answer is in these tips, why not call to arrange for an assessment so you can conquer it once and for all?  Tricia Woolfrey can be reached on 0345 130 0854.

10 tips to  manage Stress

 

© Tricia Woolfrey 2015