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The Bowen Technique

Bowen Technique with Diana Menzies Smith

 

Have you considered The Bowen Technique?

Back pain? Sports injury? Mobility problems?
Frozen shoulder? Something else? Is this you?


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What is the Bowen Technique?

The Bowen Technique is a complementary therapy that works over muscles, fascia, ligaments, tendons, nerves and the skeleton to accelerate healing, realign and balance the body.  It has an excellent track record in helping relieve many symptoms.  Results can be remarkable, even from the first session.

How does it work?

Gentle, powerful moves send messages deep into the body, penetrating to a cellular level to realign and balance the body.  Pauses allow the body time to respond to the work, begin the healing process and re-orient to a previously healthy state.  Bowen moves treat the body as a whole or can target a specific problem.  A Bowen treatment will enhance and complement other medical treatments, and conditions other than those being treated are often resolved, whether structural, physiological or emotional.

What’s it like?

Each Bowen therapy session varies according to the particular problems of the client.  By focusing on the lower and mid back and legs, the upper back, shoulders and the neck, a sense of wellbeing can be achieved, helping relaxation, aiding sleep – helping to remove everyday stress and anxiety that can make us feel under-par or prevent us functioning at our optimum. The Bowen moves are light and very precise.  Its effects go on working for days following treatment and can be long lasting.  For this reason it is better to wait a week either side of having other manual therapy.  The moves may be given through light clothing or on the skin and can assist recovery from many conditions from traumatic injury to chronic illness, depending on each individual’s capacity to heal.  It is considered suitable for everyone from pregnant women to new-born babies, the frail and the elderly.  People are amazed at the sensations and results.

Diana Menzies-Smith BTAA BTAUK IIHHT RSA VTCT is an Advanced Practitioner of The Bowen Therapeutic Technique, registered with the Bowen Association UK, Bowen Therapy Academy of Australia and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council.

If you would like a treatment with Diana Menzies-Smith’s private clinic in Weybridge:
Call:  01932 843269
Email: diana@track2health.com
www.track2health.com

To find a therapist local to your area visit: www.bowen-technique.co.uk

Self-Treatment Using Shiatsu Principles

 The  principles of Shiatsu by Liz Kendall

Shiatsu for Stress

Relaxation is often shoehorned into people’s schedules. Health and wellbeing treatments may be limited to an hour between meetings and chores, but we can ensure that their effects radiate through our lives. I find that the principles and pressure points I use when giving Shiatsu are a wonderful foundation for self-treatment.

The experience of Shiatsu is one of deep relaxation. The treatment has the benefits of Acupuncture (without the needles) and Yoga (without the effort). Shiatsu means “finger-pressure” in Japanese and it originated in China over four thousand years ago. Shiatsu uses pressure points and energy meridians with gentle movement and stretches to bring balance to the body and mind. The benefits of regular Shiatsu include reduced pain, increased flexibility, less stress and better sleep.

The touch connection in Shiatsu is a gentle yet powerful catalyst for change. The receiver remains fully clothed while pressure and movement release tense muscles and stiff joints. The nurturing touch soothes the nervous system; reducing stress hormones, promoting the release of endorphins and chemicals that encourage the body to rest and repair. Shiatsu is an antidote to the adrenalin-fuelled rush of modern life.

However life goes on between treatments, bringing challenges that can leave us physically and emotionally out of balance. This is where self-treatment comes in, enabling us to enjoy the benefits of Shiatsu in the spaces between treatments. Here’s an introduction to using pressure points, wherever you happen to be.

 

 S elf-Treatment Steps

Make yourself comfortable. Allow your breath to flow easily, fully, so that your abdomen rises and falls gently. Try smiling. Now, how do you feel? Where do your hands want to go?

There is evidence that touching the site of pain reduces the discomfort, and it is usually a natural reflex. Think of someone with a headache pressing their temples for relief, or rubbing a banged knee. Learn to trust your instincts.

Using the top of your thumb or finger (avoiding long nails), explore an area that needs attention or is the location of a pressure point. You are aiming for a feeling of connection, so adjust the angle of your thumb and the depth of pressure until you feel you’re in the right spot. When you find a point, start gently and build up to deeper pressure. There is no need to shock your body; this is a chance to be kind to yourself. Stay for a few seconds and notice the sensations.

A point that felt deep or empty at first may start to feel “filled up” as your connection draws the energy to it. Other points may feel very busy or tender, and you might press swiftly with the intention of dispersing the excess energy to where it’s needed. If any of your symptoms are severe or persistent then do seek medical advice.

 

Some helpful pressure points

Symptom: Nausea (including morning sickness and seasickness)

Treatment: (Heart Protector or Pericardium 6) Rest your hand on your wrist with your fourth finger along the wrist crease. The pressure point is around the level of your index finger, in the middle of the wrist and between the tendons. Please note: This point is known to reduce nausea, but if your body really needs to get rid of something it may speed up the process.

Symptom: Headache

Treatment: (Gall Bladder 14) This point is above the middle of each eyebrow (your thumb’s width above it). Try exploring around the temples and eyes. Also helpful is Kidney 1 on the foot (see below).

  

Symptom: Low energy, tiredness

Treatment: (Kidney 1) Curl your toes under. The point is at the deepest part of the foot, almost at the centre of the sole, beneath the ball of the foot and between the big and second toe joints. It’s also good for headaches.

 

Symptom: Digestive problems (constipation, diarrhoea)

Treatment: (Stomach 25) Three fingers’ width either side of, and in line with, your navel. You can often press quite deeply here. This point is also helpful for menstrual cramps.

  

Symptom: Muscular cramp

Treatment: (Liver 3) Follow the space between the big toe and second toe up onto the top of the foot. The point is between the metatarsal bones, about a third of the way from the roots of the toes to the front of the ankle.

 

Symptom: Lower back pain

Treatment: (Bladder meridian) Put your hands on your waist then allow your thumbs to lead the way to your spine. If this isn’t comfortable, ask a friend. There are points just under two fingers’ width from your spine on either side, outside the lower border of the vertebrae. Work downwards with your thumbs all the way to your sacrum.

 

Symptom: Neck pain

Treatment: (Bladder and Gall Bladder meridians) Use your thumbs to explore under the occipital bone at the back of your head; there are several points here. Travel down your neck and finish with a massage under the collar-bones and around the armpits, working towards the heart to encourage the elimination of toxins through the lymphatic system.

  

About Liz Kendall

I trained at the Zen School of Shiatsu in London and am registered with the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council. My practice is based in Cobham and Ewell in Surrey. I also give visiting treatments in offices to promote wellbeing in the workplace. If you would like a free consultation or have any question have any questions about Shiatsu please feel free to contact me on 07944 872332, e-mail liz@surrey-shiatsu.co.uk or visit my website www.surrey-shiatsu.co.uk.