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10 Tips to Manage Stress

Stress

 

Stress is an unavoidable part of everyday life and can come with many guises:  tight deadlines, finances, difficult relationships, job insecurity, a noisy work environment, being expected to do something you haven’t been trained to deal with and, the biggest stressor, just having way too much to do.

Untreated, it can play havoc with your health, with your relationships and your career.  This article will give you 10 tips to manage stress more successfully so you can enjoy a greater sense of calm and resourcefulness in your life.
 

  1. Recognise that some stress is actually good for you.  If you didn’t have any stress at all, you would be pretty bored.  Some stress is motivating and energising – the trick is to have it in proportion so it doesn’t have a negative impact on you.
  2. Acknowledge that stress is a valid emotion with a purpose for you:  it is calling for your attention to whatever is causing the feeling of tension or overwhelm so that you can deal with it. If you listen to what your stress is telling you and take appropriate action, you will notice yourself feeling much less stressed.  It is a survival mechanism, intended as a fight or flight response if you are in danger.  In more everyday terms, if you ignore it, the stress will increase until you take remedial action.  If you address it, you can become more stress-resilient.
  3. Identify your top stressors and give them a score out of 10 as to how much stress they are causing you.
  4. From this list, evaluate the stressors according to the following criteria:

     

     

     

     

    • Is it something which you can control in any way?  For example, the weather is something you can’t control.
    • Is it something you can influence?  While you can’t control the weather, you can control what you wear for it, whether you go out in it and the temperature in a room.
    • Is it something you just have to accept?  If you are outside and there is a sudden downpour with no shelter in sight, and you are dressed for the summer sun you were promised in the news bulletin before you left, then it is just something you have to accept.
  5. Once you have determined whether something is within your control or not you have two options:

     

     

     

     

    • Do whatever you can to control or influence the situation.  Saying ‘no’ to someone who is overloading you, for example.
    • If it is something you just have to accept, knowing this, rather than resisting it, can really relieve a lot of stress for you.  You can then focus on things you can do something about.
  6. If the list is overwhelming and you don’t know where to start, sometimes breaking a big stressor down into smaller chunks can really help, or dealing with a small stressor first to give you a sense of moving forward.  The worst thing to do is nothing, so even starting small can be a big help.
  7. Do not confuse dealing with stress with distracting from it.  Many people use distractors like comfort eating, drinking alcohol, smoking, spending, over-exercising or gambling as a way of managing how they feel.  But distraction is not a stress-management technique which works in the long-term.  It provides short-term relief but causes bigger problems for you in the long-run.
  8. Learn mindfulness, EFT or self-hypnosis as a way of handling stress.  They all make a positive and significant difference on what you can handle on a day-to-day basis.
  9. Learn to say ‘no’ and mean it.  For many people, a lot of their stress is just saying ‘yes’ to things they should be saying ‘no’ too.  This causes ongoing problems as deadlines are missed and disappointment, resentment and guilt results.  Learning to say ‘no’ kindly and respectfully is an incredibly helpful stress-management technique.
  10. Balance your life with time to yourself doing things you enjoy and making sure they include regular exercise, time out in nature and just being in the moment.

These are a good starting point.  Stress has many sources, many affects and many consequences.  Everyone is different and some solutions will work for you and some won’t.  If you need further guidance or support, or you don’t find the answer is in these tips, why not call to arrange for an assessment so you can conquer it once and for all?  Tricia Woolfrey can be reached on 0345 130 0854.

10 tips to  manage Stress

 

© Tricia Woolfrey 2015

10 Tips for Depression

depression
Depression is classified as a mental health problem. Personally, I don’t like this label because it stigmatises something that one in four people will experience in any one year.  Also, depression is such a wide issue.  It can mean that you are feeling low, or you have Seasonal Effective Disorder, or Post-Natal Depression, and it could mean that you have Bipolar disorder.

But depression can come from a variety of sources: your thinking (negativity); boredom (apathy); from stress (overwhelm); from sensitivity to life issues and can also have a biological cause – not enough serotonin will be enough to create a depressive phase.

Here are 10 tips to help you get yourself back into feeling good:

  1. Research shows that doing something nice for someone else lifts your mood.  It doesn’t have to be a big thing either.  Sometimes just opening a door for someone, letting someone go in front of you in a queue, or even a smile to a stranger, can be enough to lift you.  Kindness is one of those things that gives you something when you give it away.
  2. Exercise is brilliant for changing your mood.  It creates endorphins (brain chemicals which help you feel happy).  And you can do anything from Zumba, to running, to tennis.  The list is endless and exercising outside has an even more positive effect.
  3. Do things you really enjoy – or used to enjoy before you became depressed.  Do it even though you don’t feel like it.  It may seem a lot of effort up front but it can change your state quite quickly.  Once you start, it’s easier to carry on.
  4. Practice positive thinking.  The nature of your thinking can have a huge impact on mood.  If you feel bad, your thinking is almost definitely going to be negative.  By focusing on different things or changing how you view things, you can have an incredibly positive effect on how you feel.  Think Positive, Feel Good has a simple framework which shows you how to do this.  
  5. Plan your day around a comfortable routine.  When you are feeling low, it is all too easy to stay in bed.  This doesn’t make you feel better, it just disconnects you from the world.  So your routine should include things like taking a shower, doing some chores, taking a walk, calling a friend, listening to some feel-good music, finishing off a project.  Make sure that your tasks are realistic and reward yourself when you have achieved something.
  6. Make a list of your positive qualities and achievements.  Depression detaches you from these so write them down and read them often.  If you are struggling to come up with anything, think about what someone else would say your best traits and achievements are.  If you want a different perspective on this, watch the film 'It’s a Wonderful Life'.
  7. Make a list of all the things you’re grateful for.  Again, depression can cause you to lose sight of what is good in your life and fool you into thinking that only bad things happen.  Look at this list daily and whenever you need a boost.
  8. Avoid nicotine, alcohol and caffeine as these deplete your body of nutrients which can have a negative effect on your mood.  Alcohol is particularly bad because it is a depressant.  Before you wean yourself off these, find a new coping strategy to replace them.  EFT is brilliant for this.  Here is a video to demonstrate EFT or call me if you want some coaching on it (see below for contact details).
  9. Eliminate wheat from your diet. There is research to suggest that wheat is linked to depression.  Consider eliminating it from your diet for a month to see what difference it makes to you.  Instead, eat foods which boost your mood.  For more information on this, read this article about mood boosting food.
  10. Talk to someone.  A sympathetic friend (who doesn’t keep you stuck), The Samaritans or a compassionate professional can all help you to get back to your happy self.

If you are suffering from depression, and would like some support, why not have a free initial telephone consultation?  Call Tricia Woolfrey on 0345 130 0854.

© Tricia Woolfrey 2015

Can You Prevent Cancer?

Cancer Care By Tricia Woolfrey

 

Today is World Cancer Day.  With cancer causing one in four of all deaths in the UK and one in three people likely to contract cancer in their lifetime, it makes sense to take preventative action to ensure that you don’t become a statistic yourself.

There are more than 200 types of cancer and causes range from lifestyle, genetics and environment.  Whilst nothing is guaranteed, there is a lot you can do to help safeguard yourself against this disease:

  • Eat organic food whenever possible – especially meat
  • Eat plenty of fibre
  • Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables
  • Cancer feeds off sugar so keep your sugar intake to a minimum
  • Have a supplement program to make sure that your body is in tip-top condition
  • Enjoy regular exercise
  • Reduce your exposure to toxins such as pesticides found in non-organic food and parabens found in cosmetics and toiletries
  • With smoking causing almost 20% of all cancers, make sure you aren’t exposed to tobacco smoke
  • Keep your weight within a healthy range
  • Reduce your exposure to the sun and especially sunbeds
  • Keep your alcohol intake moderate
  • Manage stress – self hypnosis, effective problem solving techniques and EFT are great ways of doing this
  • Express your emotions constructively –bottling up emotions is toxic
  • Let go of negative emotions such as unforgiveness and anger
  • Practice meditation
  • Nurture loving and supportive relationships
  • Practice positive thinking
  • Have regular Asyra Pro assessments

It makes sense to take responsibility for your body and your health have an assessment to make sure you are in tip-top condition.  To celebrate World Cancer Day, I am offering a 25% discount if you book before the end of the week.  Call 0845 130 0854.

© Tricia Woolfrey 2012

Tricia Woolfrey is a hypnotherapist, coach, wellness practitioner and author based in Byfleet Village and Harley Street. www.pw-hypnotherapy.co.uk. 0845 130 0854.